Margaret neé Noon Tighe – and her connection to Strokestown

Margaret Noon Tighe

I found a letter from Joan Tighe Clayton, a cousin,  that contained a story about her grandmother, Margaret Noon Tighe. I was able to identify a photo of Joan’s grandmother that was given to my great-grandfather Patrick McTygue about 1870 when he left Rock County Wisconsin to move to Nebraska. My father had the tin-types and didn’t know who they were. I asked if I could take them and try to figure out who they were. I was able to discover who everyone was because I collect family photos and I keep track of all of the families.

Here is the story from a 1996 Christmas letter from Joan –

“ Another highlight of my Irish days was a list to the Famine Museum in Strokestown, County Roscommon. This is the community from which my Grandmother, Margaret Noon Tighe, and her family came at the time of the Great Irish Potato Famine. Many of the Irish families in the farm area around Clinton, Wisconsin (where my father was raised) appear to have their origins in that Strokestown Community during the Famine era. On the wall in the museum was an article from The Freeman’s Journal of April 29, 1848 in which was published a list of tenants from the Pakenham-Mahon estate which now houses the museum. A number of the names on that list are the same as those in the Clinton area I mentioned above. The museum has the best collection of Famine Records and the Museum director was kind enough to give me a copy of The Freeman’s Journal article for my files. President Mary Robinson dedicated the Strokestown Museum in 1884. The 150th Anniversary of the Commencement of the Famine was in 1995 but those who are familiar with the horrors of that time will know that the family lasted for a number of years thereafter.”

Margaret Noon was born in May of 1839 and came to America with her parents. Margaret married Michael Tygue 27 Feb 1859 and they were the parents of eight children. About 1905 the family changed the spelling of their surname from Tygue to Tighe. Margaret Tighe died in Clinton, Rock County Wisconsin 24 Sept 1918.

I do not know if the Clinton Tighe family had/has a copy of her photo. Patrick McTygue moved from Wisconsin to Nebraska about 1870 and the family must have given him the photos when he left.

Timothy Mulvihill of Kilbaha, County Kerry on #TombstoneTuesday

 

Timothy Mulvihill father of 8 from Kilbaha South, County Kerry

Timothy Mulvihill father of 8 from Kilbaha South, County Kerry

Timothy Mulvihill from Kilbaha South, County Kerry is buried in Mount Saint Mary’s Cemetery in Kansas City Missouri.

The first record I have found with Timothy Mulvihill of Kilbaha County Kerry – is the baptismal record of his son Thomas Mulvihill and Johanna Connor dated 1 April 1820.

Timothy and Johanna are the parents of eight children that I know of.

Thomas– 1 April 1820

Catherine– 19 December 1823

Johanna–10 July 1833

Timothy– 12 Feburary 1836

Michael– 12 December 1840

The other three children are documented in the will of Clifford Balch who was the grandson on Michael Mulvihill. They were:

John– ca 1825

Bridget– ca 1830

Ann– ca 1844

The oral tradition of this family was that the mother had died in Ireland and then Timothy came to Kansas City.  Timothy Mulvihill is found in Griffith’s Valuation, leasing land from Rev. Samuel B. Leonard (Rev. Lenonard is renting from Charles L. Landes, Esq.), in the townland of Kilbaha South, Parish of Murher, Barony of Iraghticonnor, County Kerry.

The only census record for Timothy Mulvihill is the 1870 census. Tim Scantlin (Scanlon) age 25 is a drayman, Bridget (Mulvihill) Moore age 30 has 5,000 in Real Estate.  Bridget is the only person on this page to have Real Estate.  Bridget owned a hotel in Kanas City at 1218 Baltimore. From marriage records Timothy and Bridget were married on the 8th of January 1870.  Timothy Mulvihill is listed as being 89 years old. I believe Timothy was about 70 to 72 years old.

Thomas Mulvihill married Margaret Morrissy and moved to KC about 1865.

Catherine Mulvihill married Michael McMahon and moved to KC about 1859.

John Mulvihill married Catharine Sheehan and moved to KC about 1856.

Bridget Mulvihill married William B. Moore first, then Timothy Scanlon in 1870, she moved to KC before 1860.

Timothy Mulvihill married Anna McCarroll and had moved to Kasnas City before 1860.

Michael Mulvihill married Ellen Clifford and had moved to Kansas City before 1860.

Anne Mulvihill married John Madden and had moved to Kansas City before 1860.

This has been a fun family to research!

 

 

 

Bridget Purcell Tygue on #TombstoneTuesday

Bridget Purcell Tygue

In 2013 I was in Wisconsin and visited the cemetery to get this photograph of Bridget Purcell Tygue’s headstone!  This really surprised me because they were kind enough to list all 5 of her children when she died in October of 1884.

Bridge Tygue

Mother of

Patrick Tygue

Michael Tygue  Mrs. Ann Coen

Mrs Catherine Conry

Mrs. Bridget Mullolly

Died Oct 24, 1884

Aged 72 years

I know a little about this family.  Bridget is my GG Grandmother.  She had all of her children in Ireland and came to America about 1849.  I don’t know what happened to her husband Michael.  Did he died before they left Ireland?  Or on the boat to America? I did find one story that said that “Mr. and Mrs. McTygue came to America.”

I do know that Bridget was looking for her brother Patrick Purcell…  From the Search for Missing Friends: Irish Immigrant Advertisements Placed in the Boston Pilot
Vol 3 Page 259

Of Patrick Purcell, of parish Shrule Co. Mayo, who when last heard of was with his nephew Michael Tigue, in North Killingly, Connecticut. Please address his sister Bridget Tigue and family Daysville, Connecticut.

The last name has been spelled

Tigue – on Patrick’s baptismal record in Shrule County Mayo in 1838.

McTigue – found on the headstones in Shrule

Tygue – on Bridget’s headstone

Tighe – what Michael changed the name to between 1900 and 1905 in Rock County Wisconsin.

Tygne – on Patrick’s Civil War discharge papers

McTygue – what Patrick used on his headstone in Eddyville Nebraska and what our branch of the family uses today!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day – Today is a Celebration of Heritage and Family!

Robert Emmett McTygue

Robert Emmett McTygue

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all.  Today is a celebration of family and heritage.  I stop to remember my father – Robert Emmett McTygue who was born on Halloween 1924 and went home to God on St. Patrick’s Day 2013.

All of my father’s ancestors came from Ireland and I have had so much fun learning about them.  I remember going to Ireland with my parents and being able to introduce Dad to cousins that he had never met.  We had such fun.

Bob McTygue & Tom Condron

This is a picture of my father and Tom Condron taken in 1990 in Lynally, Offaly- I think Dad looks more like Tom than some of his brothers.  Those Neville genes are very strong.

My father was very proud of his Irish heritage and he passed that love of Ireland, history and family to me.

Thank you Dad – you were the best!

Finding a new “branch” of my Saulsbury family tree this week!

 

 

James E Saulsbury

This has been a very exciting week! James Edward Saulsbury was born in 1869 in Effingham Illinois.  He was an older brother to my great-grandfather Charles William Saulsbury (1873-1953).

My grandmother Lucille Morgan Saulsbury told me about a ‘relative’ who lived in Montana and when he died two wives came to the funeral, but she insisted that I not tell anyone.

This Saulsbury family has been difficult to work on.  William Saulsbury married Martha Green in Effingham IL in 1862. They had one son John Franklin born in 1864.  Martha dies and William married Emily Jane Craig.  Emily was the daughter of Preston Craig and Elizabeth June James. This second marriage in Effingham, IL was 24th Dec 1868.

Emily Jane Craig and William Saulsbury have five children:

James Edward Saulsbury born March 1869.

Mary Elizabeth Saulsbury born July 1871.

Charles William Saulsbury born 25 Aug 1873 – my great-grandfather

Evaline Sue Saulsbury born 7 Sep 1876.

Ida May Saulsbury born 1879.

The family oral tradition is that William jumped into the river to save a child about 1879 and died.

Fact – by the 1880 census Emily is working as a housekeeper for 4 bachelor brothers in Holland, Shelby Co., IL.  Emily is listed as a widow and she only has the two youngest daughters living with her.

Emily marries one of the brothers – Hiram Conlisk and they have two daughters:

Ella Marie Conlisk born Dec 1881 in Missouri

Lula B. Conlisk born Feb 1888 in Center, Greeley Co., Nebraska.

In the 1900 Census Emily & Hiram are farming in Hopewell, Hayes County Nebraska. In 1910 Emily and Hiram are in Egypt, Lincoln County Washington.

This is a story of 4 adults and 8 children – 3 different families.

This week I found that James E Saulsbury had married a third time. James married Blanche Clarice Hamilton in Chinook, Blaine County Montana, he was 61 years old and she was 31 years old.  I knew that James had died in  Hill Montana 1934, he was 65 years old.  I went looking to see what had happened to Blanche – I found her working as a housekeeper in Sharmmeck Lake, Cascade County, Montana.  What else did I find – Blanche had a 7 year old daughter (born 1933) named Billy Ann Saulsbury!  She would be a second cousin to my mother!

I found that Billy Ann Saulsbury married Eldon Miller 19 Aug 1951 in Shasta California.

The best – I was able to call my mother and share this story with her.  My mother didn’t have very many cousins and this was a great surprise!  Now I hope I can find the rest of the story!

Who is your ancestor associating with? How about Thomas & Robert Pim of Tully.

Henry Nevill

Memorial No. 128121 Nevill to Wyly

Thomas Pim

Witnessed by Thomas Pim of Tully lying in the County of Kildare Gentleman and Robert Pim of the same town and county farmer.

I have  found some old documents that help me understand a little more about what life was like for my family in Ireland.

No. 128121

Nevill to Wyly

To the Register appointed for Registering Deeds 128121 A Memorial of Deed for Lease and Release bearing date respectively the seventeenth and eighteenth day of December one thousand seven hundred fifty five made between John Nevill of Mountmellick in the Queens County, Weaver of the one part and William Wyly of Gilltown in the County of Kildare farmer of the other part.

John Bagot of the Kings County Gentleman did by indenture of lease bearing date the second day of June one thousand seven hundred and forty three for the consideration therein mentioned _ to farm let unto the said William Nevill _ tenaments and crofts near the town of Mountmellick to hold for and during the natural life and lives of Henry Nevill, William Nevill and Joseph Nevill sons of said William Nevill and the survivor and survivors of theirs at the yearly rent of six pounds fifteen shillings a year.

Said deed of release mentioned which said deed of ___  gave this Memorial are Witnessed by Thomas Pim of Tully lying in the county of Kildare Gentleman and Robert Pim of the same town and county farmer.

I learned last summer that my Nevill/Neville family from Mountmellick were Irish Quakers.  I am still working on this amazing family.  Finding documents with witnesses and signatures are all pieces of their life.  One deed mentions that William Nevill was a clothier and that deed also names three of William’s sons:  Henry, William and Joseph.  There was also a son from William’s first marriage.

I am still working to transcribe these documents. But what a great project!  A deed from 1755!

Learning about Alien Case Files in Kansas City

 

 

 

The National Archives in Kansas City holds over 450,000 “Alien Case Files”

aka..(A-Files)

National Archives@KC

Elizabeth Burns from the National Archives in Kansas City presented a very informative workshop yesterday on the A-files.  The Kansas City branch of the National Archives is the main depository for these files.  (There are a few in San Francisco)

The A-files held in Kansas City are for individuals who were born 1910 and before.

If your immigrant ancestor died before 1 Aug 1940 -no A-file.

If your immigrant ancestor became a naturalized citizen between 27 Sep 1906 & 1 Aug 1940 – no A-file.

If your immigrant ancestor immigrated to the United States after 1 April 1944 – yes they will have an A-file

Registered in the US as an alien in 1940 and came back to the Immigration & Naturalization Service for any reason (other than naturalization) after 1944 – Will have an A-file.

Each file is unique. Most files contain the Alien Registration Form and Receipt Card – this for has 15 questions that your Immigrant ancestor answered.  Sometimes you might find birth and marriage certificates.

The most exciting news was that the Kansas City Archives has indexed these files and they you can search for them at:

http://www.archives.gov/research/immigration/aliens/a-files-kansas-city.html

I did a search for Mulvihill – I found an A-file for Bridget Mulvihill born 1883 in Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

Setting a goal for your genealogy research this year!

Have you set a goal for yourself and your genealogy for 2015? Are you going to research one line?  Maybe find documents to support a family story.  Or maybe you want to start writing your family history.

I still like to learn new things relating to my genealogy.  I am going to the National Archives in Kansas City this week for a workshop on the Alien Files (A-Files) these contain U.S. immigration documents generated and collected since the mid-20th century.  they include visas, photographs, applications, affidavits and correspondence.  There is another workshop I am looking forward to at the National Archives in Kansas City – “Township, Section, Range: Looking at Land Records”.  I found where some of my family came from in Ireland by using land records!

I am also going to the Mid-West Genealogical Library’s Spring Seminar in Independence Missouri.  Paul Milner is the main speaker and he is an expert in British Isles research.  This is a chance for me to learn a little about my Scottish and Welsh ancestors!

I am also going to the National Genealogy Conference in St. Charles in May.  I am really looking forward to this also.

My main goal this year is to organize my family photos!  I am scanning the older photos and putting names on photos.  It is the end of January and my desk is almost cleaned off!  One big reward was I found a photo of my father in his Navy uniform that I have been looking for!  I think this might be the year that I get those photos organized!!

Now what is your goal for 2015?

My first genealogy interview was with Francis Patrick McTygue

My grandfather Frank McTygue.

My grandfather Frank McTygue.

I found this photo this morning on my desk.  My goal this year is to work on scanning my family photos.  This is my grandfather who we all called Granddad.  In about 1962 one Sunday I found a little piece of paper in my grandparents bible.

Patrick McTygue bio

This small piece of paper intrigued me.  I was about 12 years old and this story about Patrick McTygue being born in County Mayo and fighting in the Civil War changed my life.  I had to sit down with a small tablet and ask my grandfather questions about his dad!  I still have that piece of paper!  My love of family and history evolved into what is now known as genealogy.  I just had a spiral notebook that I kept track of the family.

I find the stories and the photos bring my family history to life.  I have been to Ireland and walked the streets of Shrule County Mayo where Patrick McTygue immigrated from about 1850.  I have photos of Patrick and his brother Michael.  These brothers spell their last names differently.  “Bridget Tygue” is on their mother’s headstone in Clinton Wisconsin.  Michael is buried in the same cemetery as his mother and his headstone reads”Michael Tighe”.  Patrick left Clinton Wisconsin about 1870 and moved to Nebraska. Patrick is buried in Eddyville Nebraska and his headstone reads “Patrick McTygue”.

This is one of the reasons that I love genealogy – each document, photo and story add make the picture of my ancestors more complete.

Francis Patrick McTygue born 28 March 1886 and died 4 Oct 1964.  Frank married Mary Veronica “Vera” Neville 19 Nov 1913 when he was 27 years old.  They had nine children: John Patrick, Anna Marie, Catherine Elizabeth, Loretta Laverne, Patricia Ann, Francis Bernard, Robert Emmett, James Edward and Michael Joseph.

Thank you granddad for sitting down with me and telling me about your family!  It has been a wonderful journey!

Saving a Family Story!

Margaret Noon Tighe

 

I found a letter from Joan Tighe Clayton that contained a story about her grandmother, Margaret Noon Tighe.  I was able to identify a photo of Joan’s grandmother that was given to my great-grandfather Patrick McTygue about 1870.  My father had the tin-types and didn’t know who they were. I asked if I could take them and try to figure out who they were.  I was able to discover who everyone was because I collect family photos and I keep track of all of the families.

Here is the story from a 1996 Christmas letter from Joan —

“Another highlight of my Irish days was a list to the Famine Museum in Strokestown, County Roscommon.  This is the community from which my Grandmother, Margaret Noon Tighe, and her family came at the time of the Great Irish Potato Famine.  Many of  the Irish families in the farm area around Clinton, Wisconsin (where my father was raised) appear to have their origins in that Strokestown Community during the Famine era.  On the wall in the museum was an article from The Freeman’s Journal of April 29, 1848 in which was published a list of tenants from the Pakenham-Mahon estate which now houses the museum.  A number of the names on that list are the same as those in the Clinton area I mentioned above.  The museum has the best collection of Famine Records and the Museum director was kind enough to give me a copy of The Freeman’s Journal article for my files.  President Mary Robinson dedicated the Strokestown Museum in 1884.  The 150th Anniversary of the Commencement of the Famine was in 1995 but those who are familiar with the horrors of that time will know that the family lasted for a number of years thereafter.”

Margaret Noon was born in May of 1839 and came to America with her parents.  Margaret married Michael Tygue 27 Feb 1859 and they were the parents of eight children. About 1905 the family changed the spelling of their surname from Tygue to Tighe. Margaret Tighe died in Clinton, Rock County Wisconsin 24 Sept 1918.

I do not know if the Clinton Tighe family had a copy of her photo.  Patrick McTygue moved from Wisconsin to Nebraska about 1870 and the family must have given him the photos when he left.